NATIONAL CHENG KUNG UNIVERSITY, TAINAN, TAIWAN
BANYAN
Volume 23 Issue 7 - March 22, 2013
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Commentary
Chiang Kao
Predicting project approvals: A case of grants from the National Science Council of Taiwan
Tai-Haur Kuo
A 100 W 5.1-Channel Digital Class-D Audio Amplifier With Single-Chip Design
Article Digest
Vincent S. Tseng
Personalized Rough-Set-based Recommendation by Integrating Multiple Contents and Collaborative Information
Jen-Fin Lin
INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SHEAR BANDS INDUCED BY INDENTATION IN BULK METALLIC GLASSES
Yuh-Lang Lee
Heat Annealing Effect on the Performance of CdS/CdSe Sensitized TiO2 Photoelectrodes in Photochemical Hydrogen Generation
Tzung-Fang Guo
White-emissive tandem-type hybrid organic/polymer diodes with (0.33, 0.33) chromaticity coordinates
News Release
NCKU Press Center
NCKU transnational team reveals mystery of aging
NCKU Press Center
NCKU hosts Immigrants Building America exhibition
NCKU Press Center
Malaysia’s TCMH offer ten NTD$89,490 scholarships to Taiwan’s NCKU students
NCKU Press Center
First international conference on Orange Technologies kicks off at NCKU
NCKU Press Center
Taiwan UAV design competition and exhibition kicks off at NCKU
Banyan Forum
Opportunities
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Editorial Group
NCKU transnational team reveals mystery of aging
NCKU Press Center
[Tainan, Taiwan, Mar. 8, 2013]
Researchers have long puzzled by the mystery of aging in humans and great efforts have been put in to the attempt of discovery of the missing link. Now a National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) transnational research team has made a new discovery of aging mechanisms.

Dr. Jung-Hsien Chiang from the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, who leads the NCKU team, has revealed that the mechanisms of aging is associated with the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) as an active participant in gene silencing and the formation of peripheral heterochromatin.

The groundbreaking study carried out by Taiwan’s NCKU together with Canada’s University of Alberta (UAlberta) and US’s Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) has published in the February 28, 2013 issue of CELL.

The paper titled “A Role for the Nucleoporin Nup170p in Chromatin Structure and Gene Silencing” describes the revolutionary findings in which the seven-member transnational research team draws a clear picture that the role of yeast NPC protein Nup170p in subtelomeric gene silencing is linked to its association with the chromatin-remodeling complex.

Dr. Chiang explained that the aging of cells is closely related to telomere length and each time a cell divides, the telomere gets shorter and eventually leads to cell death; however, to date, it is unclear what functional role NPCs play in establishing and maintaining distinct chromatin domains within living cells.


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